Whakamaua: Māori Health Action Plan 2020-2025

Whakamaua sets the government’s direction for Māori health advancement over the next five years.

A plan to achieve the vision of pae ora – healthy futures for Māori

He Korowai Oranga: Māori Health Strategy sets the overarching framework that guides the Government and the health and disability to achieve the best health outcomes for Māori, with the overarching aim of pae ora – healthy futures for Māori. 

Whakamaua: Māori Health Action Plan 2020-2025 guides the Ministry, the whole health and disability system, and government to give effect to He Korowai Oranga. It sets out a suite of outcomes, objectives and priority areas for action that will contribute to the achievement of pae ora – healthy futures for Māori. 

Whakamaua has been developed alongside an Expert Advisory Group, its membership including Māori academics and researchers, health professionals, and iwi, disability and rangatahi leaders.

Whakamaua means ‘to secure, to grasp, to take hold of, to wear’. It also widely associated with the whakataukī used in this plan, ‘Ko te pae tawhiti, whāia kia tata. Ko te pae tata, whakamaua kia tīna – Seek out the distant horizons, while cherishing those achievements at hand.’ 

Whakamaua conveys a sense of acting to take hold of the pae tata, those goals within our reach, as well as working to secure pae ora.

Whakamaua also alludes to the idea that a korowai is intended to be worn. Whakamaua will bring completion and form to He Korowai Oranga so that all whānau Māori can experience health and vitality under its covering.

Whakamaua is underpinned by the Ministry of Health’s new Te Tiriti o Waitangi framework – which provides a tool for the health and disability system to fulfil its stewardship obligations and special relationship between Māori and the Crown. Te Tiriti o Waitangi not only describes Crown obligations and Māori rights, but is also a key improvement tool for achieving health equity and wellbeing for Māori. 

Whakamaua focuses on four high-level outcomes to realise the vision of pae ora:

  1. Iwi, hapū, whānau and Māori communities can exercise their authority to improve their health and wellbeing. 
  2. The health and disability system is fair and sustainable and delivers more equitable outcomes for Māori. 
  3. The health and disability system addresses racism and discrimination in all its forms. 
  4. The inclusion and protection of mātauranga Māori throughout the health and disability system. 

Whakamaua also positions the health and disability system to continue protecting the health of iwi, hapū, whānau and Māori communities in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Whakamaua will be a living document with the ability to evolve in collaboration with Māori and the health and disability sector to ensure it meets existing and emerging needs and is well placed to achieve better health outcomes for Māori. The Ministry of Health will measure and report progress regularly as the plan moves forward. 

Shaped by the voices of people -Whatua – Summary Report 

Whakamaua has been shaped by feedback provided during an extensive engagement process. This feedback was given by iwi, hapū, whānau and Māori communities, as well as key stakeholders across the health and disability sector and government.

A summary of these engagement insights has been published in the companion document, Whatua – Summary Report, which gives visibility to the voices of those who contributed in the engagement process. 

‘Whatua’ means ‘to weave’ or ‘knit’. In this context, Whatua speaks to the weaving together of the many voices heard and perspectives shared during engagement. Much like the knitting together of muka (flax fibre) to create korowai, these engagements have helped shape Whakamaua by providing us with a clear idea of the key priorities and focus areas for Māori health over the next five years.

Whatua provides a broad overview of the key issues and opportunities in Māori health and wellbeing. While it has been used to shape the direction of Whakamaua, it can be used as a source of insights to inform the development of other strategies, plans, and initiatives.   

We would like to acknowledge the Expert Advisory Group, iwi, hapū, whānau and Māori communities, and the health and disability sector for their feedback, insights and guidance. The contribution of each individual, group, organisation and association in this process is very much appreciated.

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