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Diabetes

Indicator Māori Non-Māori
Males Females Total Males Females Total
Table 28: Diabetes indicators, by gender, Māori and non-Māori [1]
Diagnosed diabetes prevalence (self-reported), 15+ years, percent, 2013/14 6.0
(4.7–7.5)
5.3
(4.1–6.7)
5.6
(4.7–6.6)
3.5
(2.9–4.1)
2.1
(1.6–2.6)
2.8
(2.4–3.1)
Diabetes complications – renal failure with concurrent diabetes (type 1 and type 2 diabetes), 15+ years, rate per 100,000, 2012–14 115.1
(106.5–124.1)
81.1
(74.5–88.1)
97.1
(91.7–102.7)
20.7
(19.7–21.8)
14.5
(13.7–15.3)
17.5
(16.9–18.2)
Diabetes complications – lower limb amputation with concurrent diabetes (type 1 and type 2 diabetes), 15+ years, rate per 100,000, 2012–14 41.8
(36.7–47.3)
22.3
(18.9–26.2)
31.4
(28.4–34.6)
13.3
(12.5–14.1)
5.3
(4.8–5.8)
9.1
(8.7–9.6)

Table 28 shows that the self-reported prevalence of diabetes[2] among Māori was about twice that of non-Māori in 2013/14 (RR 1.99, CI 1.65–2.40). It also shows that there are much higher disparities between Māori and non-Māori for diabetes complications.

Renal failure is one of the complications of diabetes. Rates of renal failure with concurrent diabetes for Māori aged 15 and over were more than 5 times that of non-Māori at the same age group in 2012–14 (RR 5.55, CI 5.07–6.07). While some of this difference can be attributed to the higher prevalence of diabetes among Māori, the disproportionately higher rate suggests that Māori with diabetes are more likely to have renal failure than non-Māori with diabetes. The extent of the disparity can be estimated by dividing the relative risk of renal failure by the relative risk of prevalence (ie, 5.55 ÷ 1.99), which suggests that among people with diabetes, Māori are 2.8 times as likely as non-Māori to have renal failure.

Lower limb amputation is another complication of diabetes. Similarly, rates of lower limb amputation with concurrent diabetes for Māori were over 3 times that of non-Māori in 2012–14 (RR 3.44, CI 2.96–3.99). Therefore, among people with diabetes, lower limb amputations among Māori can be estimated as 1.7 times that of non-Māori (ie, 3.44 ÷ 1.99).

Indicator Māori Non-Māori
Males Females Total Males Females Total
Table 29: Type 2 diabetes (diagnosed after 25 years of age) prevalence, by gender, Māori and non-Māori, 2013/14 [3]
Type 2 diabetes (diagnosed after 25 years of age) prevalence (self-reported), 15+ years, percent, 2013/14 5.2
(4.1–6.7)
4.3
(3.1–5.7)
4.7
(3.9–5.6)
3.1
(2.5–3.7)
1.7
(1.3–2.1)
2.4
(2.0–2.7)

Māori adults were about 1.5 times as likely as non-Māori adults to have been diagnosed with diabetes after 25 years of age in 2013/14; that is, the self-reported prevalence of type 2 diabetes for Māori was about 50% higher than that for non-Māori (RR 1.49, CI 1.32–1.69).


1. Notes:

Sources: 2013/14 New Zealand Health Survey, Ministry of Health; National Minimum Data Set (NMDS), Ministry of Health


2. Note that using self-reported diabetes as a measure underestimates the true prevalence, because some people living with type 2 diabetes have not yet been diagnosed.


3. Notes:

Source: 2013/14 New Zealand Health Survey, Ministry of Health

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