Executive Leadership Team

Members

The ELT membership is decided by the Director-General of Health, and includes:

Dr Ashley Bloomfield: Director-General of Health and Chief Executive

Dr Bloomfield qualified in medicine at the University of Auckland in 1990 and after several years of clinical work specialised in public health medicine. His particular area of professional interest is non-communicable disease prevention and control, and he spent 2011 at the World Health Organization in Geneva working on this topic at a global level.

Dr Bloomfield was Chief Executive at Hutt Valley District Health Board from 2015 to 2018. Prior to that, he held a number of senior leadership roles within the Ministry of Health.

Maree Roberts: Deputy Director-General System Strategy and Policy

Maree has had a wide range of experience in the public service, primarily in social sector policy relating to children, young people, families and communities.

Maree has held several senior roles in the Ministry for Social Development in Policy and Service Delivery and recently in the new Ministry for Children. Maree has managed large government programmes such as the White Paper for Vulnerable Children and the development of the Vulnerable Children Act. She has also led several change programmes relating to Child, Youth and Family, Vulnerable Children and the Ministerial Work Programme on Family and Sexual Violence.

Over her career, Maree has had a variety of roles including as a Private Secretary, managing employment and skills policy in the Department of Labour, and working for the Ministry of Education in Christchurch following the earthquakes. Recently Maree contributed to the set-up of the new Children’s Ministry.

Sue Gordon: Deputy Director-General Corporate ServicesSue Gordon

Most recently Sue was Public Sector Manager at Microsoft NZ working with government agencies and had responsibility for negotiation and delivery of the all-of-government agreement.

Prior to Microsoft, Sue held senior management roles at Land Information NZ and the Ministry for Economic Development leading their corporate functions.

Sue’s first management role was HR Manager in the Ministry of Health. The commitment and passion of the people who work in the health sector were a highlight of her time with the Ministry and she is delighted to be returning to the Ministry and the wider health sector.

Robyn Shearer: Deputy Director-General, Mental Health and AddictionRobyn Shearer

Robyn comes to this role with a vast range of sector experience having been the CEO for Te Pou o te Whakaaro nui for the last ten years.

During her time Robyn has grown Te Pou to be internationally recognised for evidence based workforce programmes in mental health, addiction and disability and has created strong sector partnerships to enhance people’s lives through service improvement.

Robyn comes from a clinical background, beginning her experience with nursing and has worked in front line mental health services and leadership roles in District Health Boards. 

She has also worked in the Health Research Council and Ministry of Health in workforce development, policy and leading the Mental Health Group.

Shayne HunterShayne Hunter: Deputy Director-General Data and Digital

Shayne has spent the last 15 years in the health and disability sector where he developed a strong a passion for information and technology enabled improvements for the system and for the health outcomes for individuals and our population.

His most recent role has been the Chief Information Officer (CIO) for Capital & Coast, Hutt Valley and Wairarapa DHBs where he’s been a member of the ELT for each district health board.

He currently chairs the Central Region DHB’s CIO group and was previously the Chair of the Health Sector National IS Leaders Forum.

Deborah Woodley: Deputy Director-General Population Health and Prevention

Deborah first joined the Ministry of Health in 1996 and during her 21 years with the organisation held a range of senior leadership roles mainly related to personal and population health. Highlights of her career to date include the establishment of the New Zealand Blood Service and Healthline, the development of the palliative care strategy and management of the cancer programme including the development of bowel screening.

She returns to the Ministry after spending two years at Hutt Valley DHB as Service Group Manager, Surgical, Women's and Children's Health.

Michelle ArrowsmithMichelle Arrowsmith: Deputy Director-General DHB Performance, Support and Infrastructure

Michelle commenced her career in health as a dietitian and worked clinically for a number of years before moving into senior operational management where she's held the positions of Chief Operating Officer and deputy Chief Executive. Michelle’s senior leadership career to date has spanned acute, community and primary care both in her 20 years in the NHS and her time in Australia. 

Michelle has led across multi-site and organisational boundaries in health care, in particular delivering on reform programmes and integration of acute, community and primary care services. Michelle also has significant experience in system leadership and clinical and financial sustainability of health services. 

Keriana Brooking: Deputy Director-General Health System Improvement and Innovation

Keriana Brooking has been with the Ministry since 2014 in a number of senior positions, starting as Chief Advisor System Integration, and most recently as Deputy Director – Service Commissioning. When she first stepped into a senior role in health, it was as DHB Planning and Funding Manager at Tairawhiti District Health Board. When Primary Health Organisations (PHOs) first formed in 2002, she became Chief Executive Officer of Turanganui PHO. Subsequently six PHOs merged and Keriana went on to become Deputy CEO and General Manager Practice Services of the Midlands Health Network.

Keriana has whakapapa links to Ngāti Pāhauwera me Ngāti Kahungunu ki te Wairoa and is widely recognised for her dedication and commitment to improving the health of New Zealanders, backed by a high level of experience in the context of change. 

John Whaanga: Deputy Director-General, Māori HealthJohn Whaanga

John is affiliated to Ngāti Rākaipaaka, Ngāti Kahungunu and Ngāti Rongomaiwahine. In 2018, John was acknowledged in parliament for his work in successfully negotiating a $100 million Treaty of Waitangi settlement for Ngā Iwi me Ngā Hapū o Te Rohe o Te Wairoa – this was the culmination of over 30 years work. 

John began his career in the Department of Conservation in 1989 (working on Treaty of Waitangi policy and negotiations), before moving on to the Ministry of Education (Māori Education Group) in 1991. 

John originally joined the Ministry of Health in 1993, as a foundation member of the then newly-established Māori Health Directorate, Te Kete Hauora. John then spent six years working in the Ministry, culminating in management roles in both public health and Māori health (as Manager, Te Kete Hauora).

In the last six years John has undertaken a number of significant roles in tertiary education, including as: Chief Advisor Wānanga, Tertiary Education Commission; Deputy Chief Executive, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa; and Chief Operating Officer, Taratahi Institute of Agriculture.

Margareth BroodkoornMargareth Broodkoorn: Chief Nursing Officer

Margareth has a proud bicultural heritage with Maori (Ngapuhi) and Dutch whakapapa.  She graduated as a Registered General Obstetric Nurse from the Greenlane School of Nursing in 1990. 

Prior to the appointment as the Chief Nursing Officer with the Ministry of Health in February 2019 Margareth was the Director of Nursing and Midwifery at NDHB.    With over 30 years of health sector experience that includes clinical practice and leadership, operational management, strategic governance and education roles within Aotearoa, NZ.  She has worked with Maori health and community providers in Northland, as a lecturer with Manukau Institute of Technology and Auckland University, and nursing practice and leadership roles with Auckland DHB

Margareth is committed to Te Tiriti o Waitangi, addressing Maori health inequities, improving access to health services for all consumers, and developing an enabled, responsive culturally safe workforce.  She is passionate that nursing can make a significant difference in achieving equitable health outcomes across Aotearoa with a sustainable future focused nursing workforce that leads change and innovation in partnership with the wider health team.

Andy SimpsonDr Andrew Simpson: Chief Medical Officer

Dr Andy Simpson is the Ministry’s Chief Medical Officer. Prior to this he was the National Clinical Director, Cancer, providing strategic and clinical leadership to the Ministry's cancer programme. He was also the champion for the Faster cancer treatment health target.

A medical oncologist by training, Andy is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators.

Prior to joining the Ministry in 2012, Andy held a number of clinical leadership roles, these included Executive Director (Clinical), Medicine Cancer & Community at Capital and Coast DHB, and the Clinical Director of the Central Cancer Network.

The Chief Medical Officer works alongside the Chief Nursing Officer to provide clinical leadership and advice across the Ministry and the sector to support the design, planning, implementation and evaluation of health service delivery.

Andy SimpsonMartin Chadwick: Chief Allied Health Professions Officer 

Martin joins the Ministry of Health from the Bay of Plenty DHB where he has held the post of Executive of Director Allied Health, Scientific and Technical for the last two years.

Previously he held a similar role at Counties Manukau DHB for six years. He has over 25 years of health experience in a range of roles in both the USA and New Zealand and has filled a variety of clinical, managerial and strategic leadership roles. He is the current chair of the National Directors of Allied Health group.

Martin has recently completed his doctoral degree via AUT examining health workforce change. Martin is passionate about the untapped potential that allied health professions can bring in improving the quality of care provided to our populations, and in turn better meeting equitable population health needs.

Adri IsbisterAdri Isbister: Deputy Director-General, Disability

Adri came to us from the Wairarapa DHB where she was CEO. During her tenure, Adri  led the development of cross-sector work and the implementation of Health Care Home, a primary care initiative.

Adri has over 25 years’ experience in the health and disability sector. She is the former leader of LIFE Unlimited, a national health and disability service provider. She also supported the implementation of the New Zealand Disability Strategy and has held governance positions within the national Needs Assessment Service Co-ordination Association (NASCA) and disability information services.

Adri holds an executive Masters in Business Administration and has received two business excellence awards.

Monique Burrows

Sarah Turner: Deputy Director, Office of the Director-General

Sarah comes to us from the Ministry of Justice, where she has spent the last eight years in group management and deputy secretary roles. 

Sarah’s management career has included policy, service delivery and operations, as well as leading and embedding organisational change.  Her most recent role spanned service design and improvement, service commissioning, and implementing legislative change. 

Sarah has led teams and business units ranging in size from nine to 900 people.

Anna Clark: Deputy Director-General Health Workforce

Anna ClarkAnna comes to the Ministry of Health from the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development, where she has been the acting Head of the Office of the Chief Executive.

Anna has a strong public sector track record and brings a range of employment relation skills and workforce strategy development experience.

Anna’s management career has included practising as an employment lawyer in large law firms and in-house legal teams within both the public and private sectors. 

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