COVID-19: Getting other vaccines

When you should get your flu, MMR and pregnancy vaccinations if you’re also getting your COVID-19 vaccine and which vaccines are most important.

Last updated: 16 June 2021

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Getting a flu vaccine

Allow at least two weeks between the COVID-19 vaccine and the influenza (flu) vaccine.

If you have a COVID-19 vaccination appointment

Get both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine first – these doses are given at least three weeks apart. You can get your flu vaccine from two weeks after your second dose.

If you don’t have a COVID-19 vaccination appointment

Get your flu vaccination first. You can get your first COVID-19 vaccination from two weeks after this.


Getting an MMR vaccine

If you're 16-30 years old, you may need to get a Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccination too. We recommend you get both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine first – these doses are at least three weeks apart.

If you get the COVID-19 vaccine first

If you get the COVID-19 vaccine first, you’ll need to wait at least two weeks after the second dose before you get the MMR vaccine.

If you get the MMR vaccine first

If you get the MMR vaccine first, you’ll need to wait at least four weeks before you get the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.


If you’ve had a COVID-19 vaccine overseas

There are a range of different COVID-19 vaccines being used internationally. This means some people arriving in New Zealand have been vaccinated with the same or different vaccines.

The COVID-19 vaccines are not interchangeable and there is limited data on using combinations of different vaccines.

If you’ve had a dose of the Pfizer vaccine overseas

If you’ve already had one dose of the Pfizer vaccine (Comirnaty) overseas (the same COVID-19 vaccine we’re using in New Zealand), you’ll need to have a second dose once you arrive in New Zealand at least three weeks after your first dose.

You won’t necessarily be eligible for your second vaccination immediately when you New Zealand.  The timing of your second dose will depend on which rollout group you’re in.

Currently, there is no maximum time limit between doses – you won’t need to repeat the first dose or get a third dose.

Find out when you can get a vaccine – Unite against COVID-19 tool

Getting your second dose increases protection

If you’ve had a different COVID-19 vaccine overseas

You may have had one dose of a different COVID-19 vaccine overseas that’s not currently available in New Zealand, for example:

  • AstraZeneca
  • Moderna
  • Janssen

At this stage, we recommend you get a dose of the Pfizer vaccine when it becomes available to you in New Zealand. This must be at least four weeks after the first vaccine you received overseas.

These vaccines are not interchangeable, but you’re likely to have a good response to an additional single dose of the Pfizer vaccine. This is because all the vaccines target the immune response to the same part of the COVID-19 virus.

If you’ve had one dose of the Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) vaccine, you’re considered fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and won’t need any more doses.


Vaccinations for pregnancy

If you’re pregnant and choose to get the COVID-19 vaccine, you can still get the other vaccinations you need.

We recommend a two-week gap between these vaccines. There are no safety concerns about getting any of them closer together – don’t delay getting vaccinated if it’s needed.

Vaccine advice if you’re pregnant

If you’re getting the flu vaccine

If you’re pregnant you can get the influenza (flu) vaccine at any stage of your pregnancy. If possible, get this either two weeks before your first dose of COVID-19 vaccine, or two weeks after your second dose.

If you’re at risk of exposure to COVID-19, get both the COVID-19 vaccine doses before your flu vaccine.

You can get the flu vaccine at the same time as your whooping cough vaccine.

If you’re getting the whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine

If you’re pregnant you can get the whooping cough vaccine (Boostrix) from 16 weeks of pregnancy. If possible, have this either two weeks before your first dose of COVID-19 vaccine, or two weeks after your second dose.

You can get the whooping cough vaccine at the same time as your flu vaccine.

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