Mental Health and Addiction: Service use 2012/13

Published online: 
12 May 2016

Summary

These tables are the latest release of routine mental health and addiction data. The information is broken down by age (including youth), sex, ethnicity, DHB of domicile and deprivation. Key findings are as follows:

Demographics

In 2012/13, 154,752 clients were seen by mental health and addiction services. Of these, 82,474 (53.3%) were male, and 72,268 (46.7%) were female.

Of the ethnic groups reported, Māori were the most likely to be seen by mental health and addiction services, with 5987.7 clients seen for every 100,000 Māori population, while Asians were the least likely to be seen with 1017.9 clients seen for every 100,000 Asian population (these rates have been age-standardised to the World Health Organization (WHO) standard world population).

There were 130,887 clients seen by DHBs and 52,885 clients seen by NGOs. Some of these clients were seen by both DHBs and NGOs.

Of the 154,752 clients seen in 2012/13, the majority (137,112 or 88.6%) were seen face-to-face. The remaining 11.4% received services that involved care co-ordination contacts, contact with family/whānau, written correspondence, telephone calls and text messages.

The rate of Māori seen by DHBs has risen in recent years from 2806.5 per 100,000 Māori population in 2001/02 to 4499.9 in 2012/13 (a rise of 60.3%), while the rate of non-Māori seen has risen more slowly from 2114.6 per 100,000 non-Māori population in 2001/02 to 2797.5 in 2012/13 (a rise of 32.3%).

Clients seen by organisation

The most common type of team providing services to DHB clients was community teams, who provided services to 64.1% of clients seen by DHBs, while the next most common team type was alcohol and drug teams who provided services to 18.8% of DHB clients. For NGOs, this pattern was similar; the most common team type was community teams, who provided services to 49.6% of clients seen by NGOs. Alcohol and drug teams were the next most common team type, providing services to 34.0% of NGO clients.

Activity type

The most common type of activity (or service) provided by DHBs in 2012/13 was ‘mental health individual treatment attendances: family not present’. This activity type accounted for 40.9% of all DHB services provided. In contrast, the most common type of activity provided by NGOs in 2012/13 was ‘community support contacts’, which accounted for 29.3% of all NGO services provided.

Team details

For DHBs, inpatient teams provided the majority of bednights (70.8% of all DHB bednights). For NGOs, residential teams provided the majority of bednights (78.1% of all NGO bednights).

The most common type of activity provided by community teams in 2012/13 was ‘individual treatment attendances: family/whānau not present’ which accounted for 32.9% of all services provided by community teams. 111,869 people accessed services provided by community teams in 2012/13.

The most common type of activity provided by inpatient teams in 2012/13 was ‘mental health acute inpatient or equivalent occupied bed nights’ which accounted for 50.4% of all activities provided by inpatient teams. 9753 people accessed services provided by inpatient teams in 2012/13.

The most common type of activity provided by alcohol and drug teams in 2012/13 was ‘individual treatment attendances – family/whānau not present’ which accounted for 32.4% of all activities provided by alcohol and drug teams. 47,458 people accessed services provided by alcohol and drug teams in 2012/13.

The most common type of activity provided by child and youth teams in 2012/13 was ‘individual treatment attendances: family/whānau not present' which accounted for 26.8% of all child and youth activities. 32,749 people accessed services provided by child and youth teams in 2012/13.

The most common type of activity provided by forensic teams was ‘medium secure inpatient occupied bed nights' which accounted for 29.6% of all forensic activities. 5739 people accessed services provided by forensic teams in 2012/13.

The most common type of activity provided by kaupapa Māori teams was ‘individual treatment attendances – family/whānau not present’ which accounted for 21.6% of all kaupapa Māori activities. 17,689 people accessed services provided by kaupapa Māori teams in 2012/13.

Activity setting

The two most common settings in which activities took place were ‘onsite’ and ‘telephone’. Together they accounted for 56.8% of all activities in 2012/13.

Referrals

Referrals to mental health and addiction teams were most likely to come from ‘self or relative referral’ (25.8%), or a ‘general practitioner’ (14.6%).

Discharges from mental health and addiction teams were most likely to be to ‘no further referral’ (40.4%), or to a ‘general practitioner’ (18.1%).

Deprivation

People living in the most deprived areas were 2.5 times more likely to be seen by mental health and addiction services than people living in the least deprived areas (6323.1 per 100,000 population compared to 2526.9 per 100,000 population, age-standardised to the World Health Organisation (WHO) standard world population).

Long-term clients

As at 30 June 2013, there were 30,572 long term clients that were seen by mental health and addiction services for one year or more. Out of these clients, 19,701 were seen for two years or more.

Legal status

Males were more likely to be subject to the Mental Health Act than females. In 2012/13, the rate for males was 254.9 per 100,000 compared with 157.0 per 100,000 females.

Māori were more likely to be assessed or treated under the Mental Health Act than non-Māori. In 2012/13, the rate for Māori was 443.0 per 100,000 compared with 161.9 per 100,000 for non-Māori.

Seclusion

In 2012/13, 1055 clients were secluded for a total of 1572 seclusion events, equating to an average of 1.5 events per client. Seclusion is the placing of a client at any time, and for any duration, alone in a room or area from which they cannot exit.

Electroconvulsive therapy

In 2012/13, 232 clients received a total of 2566 electroconvulsive therapy treatments, equating to an average of 11.1 treatments per client. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a therapeutic procedure in which a brief pulse of electricity is delivered to a patient’s brain in order to produce a seizure. For more information about ECT see the ‘Glossary’ worksheet.

Outcomes

The distribution of mean total HoNOS scores shows that clients had a reduction in the mean score between admission and discharge.

The distribution of clinically significant HoNOS items also showed this same expected pattern.

The index of severity shows that clients admitted to an inpatient unit were quite unwell (62.1% had severe symptoms). Also, as expected, fewer clients had severe symptoms when they were discharged with no further care (14.2% had severe symptoms). 

Errata

This revised edition corrects an error within the long term clients section of the key findings published below and within the accompanying spreadsheet. If you have used long term client key finding data, published before 15/07/2016, please replace with this revised version. The error is within the key findings only and the numbers published within table 41-43 are correct.

Publishing information

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