Your developing baby: weeks 0–14

Although there are big changes happening during the first few weeks of your pregnancy, most of them are happening inside your body. Your baby bump probably isn’t showing, so most people won’t be able to tell that you’re pregnant.

Your developing baby

6–7 weeks

At 7 weeks your baby is about 8 mm long from head to bottom. The brain is growing and the heart is beginning to beat. Ears, eyes, arms and legs are also starting to grow. Your baby will start to move, but you won’t be able to feel it yet.

8–9 weeks

At 9 weeks your baby is about 17 mm long from head to bottom. Your baby’s face is slowly forming and there are eyelids. They have a mouth and a tongue. Hands and feet, with ridges where the fingers and toes will be, are also beginning to grow.

10–12 weeks

By 12 weeks your baby is fully formed. They have all their organs, muscles, limbs and bones and can kick and move.

13–14 weeks

By 14 weeks baby can swallow and their fingerprints have formed.

Your changing body

During early pregnancy you may have some or all of the following: 

  • no periods or lighter bleeding
  • breast and nipple changes
  • a need to go to the toilet (wee/mimi) more often than usual
  • bloating, cramps and backache
  • morning sickness
  • more saliva in your mouth than usual
  • feeling dizzy or fainting
  • feeling tired
  • headaches
  • constipation (when you have 3 or fewer bowel movements [poos/tuutae] in a week) and wind (farting)
  • no interest in sex, or wanting to have sex more often.

See the Kidspot website to find out more.

Your mood may also change during pregnancy – this is normal. Some days you may feel wonderful and others not so good. See Mood changes in pregnancy on the National Women’s Health website (it’s at the bottom of the page).

Talk to your midwife (or specialist doctor) if you are worried about your changing body or mood.


Related websites

Whakatipu: Te Kākano (pregnancy to birth) – SKIP
This is a time when both māmā and our unborn pēpi need to be cared for, a time to talk about expectations and experiences with all the whānau. Te Kākano gives some practical information and some creative activities that will help to prepare whānau for the upcoming birth of pēpi.

1–40 step-by-step guide – MAMA Maternity Information Services
A weekly guide to pregnancy, including your developing baby, your changing body and some of the decisions and choices that need to be made as your pregnancy progresses.

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