Prostate Cancer Awareness and Quality Improvement Programme: Improving outcomes for men with prostate cancer

Published online: 
23 May 2013
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Summary

The Prostate Cancer Awareness and Quality Improvement Programme (AQIP) outlines the issues that currently exist for the early detection and treatment of prostate cancer in New Zealand. The AQIP provides solutions to these issues and identifies the next steps for the Ministry of Health and the wider health sector.

Currently, men in New Zealand can receive confusing information on the early detection and treatment of prostate cancer. In addition, there are differences in the quality of care available to men throughout the health service, from primary to tertiary level care. Men who may benefit from early diagnosis and treatment can have limited opportunity for access to appropriate health services while men who would otherwise not have any complications from prostate cancer may suffer harms from overdiagnosis and overtreatment.

The AQIP aims to address current deficiencies by:

  • ensuring men have better access to consistent information about prostate cancer
  • supporting general practitioners (GPs) to effectively manage men presenting for assessment of prostate cancer or prostate cancer risk
  • removing barriers that restrict the effective use of diagnostic and treatment services
  • ensuring that all men have consistent care and equitable outcomes across the whole prostate cancer care pathway.

A national prostate cancer working group will be established to guide the successful implementation of the Prostate Cancer Awareness and Quality Improvement Programme.

Publishing information

  • Date of publication:
    23 May 2013
  • ISBN:
    978-0-478-40272-8 (online)
  • HP number:
    5655
  • Citation:
    Ministry of Health. 2013. Prostate Cancer Awareness and Quality Improvement Programme: Improving outcomes for men with prostate cancer. Wellington: Ministry of Health.
  • Ordering information:
    Only soft copy available to download
  • Copyright status:
    Owned by the Ministry of Health and licensed for reuse under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.
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