Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use web tool

The Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use web tool presents data relating to specialist inpatient and community mental health and addiction services provided in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Published online: 
03 May 2022
Preview of webtool

Contents

 


Summary

The Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use web tool presents data related to specialist inpatient and community mental health and addiction services provided in Aotearoa New Zealand. The information included in this tool was provided to the Ministry of Health’s PRIMHD National Collection by district health boards (DHBs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) funded by the Ministry of Health. Specifically, we include demographic and geographic information, client referral pathways, the types of services provided, supplementary consumer records, and diagnosis information.

The web tool contains data for the financial years from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2021 and it replaces the Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use publication series that consisted of spreadsheets released annually.The web tool allows you to select areas of interest, and download the related data.

The tables do not include information on:

  • the provision of primary mental health care, such as care provided by general practitioners
  • mental health services funded by other government departments, for example funded by the Ministry of Social Development
  • problem gambling
  • people with a mental health condition who do not access services.

View the Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use web tool.

Data quality and interpretation notes are available in the web tool.


Data sources

Data is sourced from the Programme for the Integration of Mental Health Data (PRIMHD). PRIMHD contains data about Ministry of Health-funded mental health and addiction service activity and outcomes. The data is collected from district health boards (DHBs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

PRIMHD data is used to report on what services are being provided, who is providing the services, and what outcomes are being achieved for health consumers across New Zealand's mental health sector. These reports enable better-quality service planning and decision making by mental health and addiction service providers, at local, regional and national levels.


Alternative data sources

Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use data was previously published in static tables. As part of the development of the web tool, a review of content was conducted and as a result some changes were made to the information published . These changes were made for the data released in 2022.

Data is now available on supplementary consumer records, including accommodation, employment and education, and also whether or not a wellness plan is in place.

Some data published in previous editions of the Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use tables is no longer in the web tool because it is published elsewhere.

This includes:

  • Data on clients with a Mental Health Act or Substance Addiction Act legal status, and seclusion and electroconvulsive therapy events, reported by the Office of the Director of Mental Health and Addiction Services, ODMHAS.
  • Health of the Nation Outcome Scores, reported by Te Pou.

All of the data included in the previous version of the Mental Health and Addiction: Service Use data tables is available on request by contacting [email protected]

Key findings

Demographics

  • In 2020/21, a total of 190,969 clients accessed mental health and addiction services. Of these, 95,692 (50.1%) were male, and 95,277 (49.9%) were female.
  • In 2020/21, of the ethnic groups reported, Māori were the most likely to access mental health and addiction services, with 6363.8 clients accessing services for every 100,000 Māori population; while Asian clients were the least likely to access services, with 1290.0 clients accessing services for every 100,000 Asian population. (These rates have been age standardised to the World Health Organisation’s standard world population.)
  • In 2020/21, there were 153,663 clients accessing services provided by DHBs and 79,956 clients accessing services provided by NGOs. Some of these clients accessed services provided by both DHBs and NGOs.
  • In 2020/21, the majority of clients (154,166 or 81%) were seen face to face. The remaining 19% received services that involved care co-ordination contacts, contact with family/whānau, written correspondence, telephone calls and text messages, or social media contacts/e-therapy. Some clients received both face-to-face and non-face-to-face services.
  • The rate of Māori clients accessing services provided by DHBs decreased from 4875.6 per 100,000 population in 2012/13 to 4634.2 in 2020/21 (a change of 5%).
  • The rate of Pacific clients accessing services provided by DHBs decreased from 2713.4 per 100,000 population in 2012/13 to 2573.2 in 2020/21 (a change of 5%).
  • The rate of Asian clients accessing services provided by DHBs increased from 942.5 per 100,000 population in 2012/13 to 1137.1 in 2020/21 (a change of 21%).
  • The rate of European or Other clients accessing services provided by DHBs increased from 3124.7 per 100,000 population in 2012/13 to 3649.1 in 2020/21 (a change of 17%).
  • In 2020/21, people living in the most deprived (quintile 5) areas were 1.7 times more likely to access mental health and addiction services than people living in the least deprived (quintile 1) areas (5675.8 and 3312.8 per 100,000 population, respectively, age standardised to the World Health Organisation’s standard world population).

Services provided

  • The most common type of team providing services to DHB clients was community teams, who provided services to 77% of clients accessing services provided by DHBs, while the next most common team type was alcohol and drug teams, who provided services to 19% of DHB clients. For NGOs, the most common team type was community teams, who provided services to 67% of clients accessing services provided by NGOs, while the next most common team type was alcohol and drug teams, who provided services to 30% of NGO clients.

Activity type

  • The most common type of activity (or service) provided by DHBs in 2020/21 was ‘individual treatment attendances: family/whanau not present’. This activity type accounted for 44% of all DHB services provided. In contrast, the most common type of activity provided by NGOs in 2020/21 was ‘community support contacts’, which accounted for 24% of all NGO services provided.

Activity setting

  • The two most common settings in which contacts took place were ‘telephone’ and ‘onsite’. Together, they accounted for 55% of all contacts in 2020/21.

Team details

  • For DHBs in 2020/21, inpatient teams provided the majority of bednights (70% of all DHB bednights). For NGOs, residential/accommodation teams provided the majority of bednights (76% of all NGO bednights).
  • The most common type of activity provided by community teams in 2020/21 was ‘individual treatment attendances: family/whanau not present’ which accounted for 37% of all services provided by community teams.
  • The most common type of activity provided by alcohol and drug teams in 2020/21 was ‘individual treatment attendances: family/whanau not present’ which accounted for 36% of all services provided by alcohol and drug teams.
  • The most common type of activity provided by child and youth teams in 2020/21 was ‘individual treatment attendances: family/whanau not present’ which accounted for 27% of all services provided by child and youth teams.
  • The most common type of activity provided by forensic teams in 2020/21 was ‘medium secure inpatient occupied bed nights’ which accounted for 32% of all services provided by forensic teams.
  • The most common type of activity provided by inpatient teams in 2020/21 was ‘mental health acute inpatient or equivalent occupied bed nights’ which accounted for 51% of all services provided by inpatient teams.
  • The most common type of activity provided by Kaupapa Māori teams in 2020/21 was ‘individual treatment attendances: family/whanau not present’ which accounted for 26% of all services provided by Kaupapa Māori teams.

Referrals

  • Referrals to mental health and addiction teams were most likely to come from ‘self or relative referral’ (28%), or ‘general practitioner’ (17%).
  • Discharges from mental health and addiction teams were most likely to be to ‘no further referral’ (28%), or ‘general practitioner’ (24%).

Long-term clients

  • As at the end of the 2020/21 financial year, there were 35,281 clients that accessed mental health and addiction services for one year or more. Out of these clients, 21,868 accessed services for two years or more.

Supplementary consumer records

  • 63% of clients with a supplementary consumer record in 2020/21 had a wellness plan.
  • 15% of clients with a supplementary consumer record in 2020/21 were in paid full-time employment; 10% were in paid part-time employment; and 75% were not in paid employment.
  • 30% of clients with a supplementary consumer record in 2020/21 were participating in education or training provided by an education organisation that is accredited, registered or recognised by NZQA.
  • 85% of clients with a supplementary consumer record in 2020/21 lived independently; 11% were in supported living; and 4% were homeless.

Disclaimer

This web tool presents data to the latest year for which data is available for publication. We have quality checked the collection, extraction, and reporting of the data presented here. However, errors can occur. Please contact the Data Services team at the Ministry of Health if you have any concerns regarding any of the data or analyses presented here. The Ministry of Health makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor assumes legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, correctness or use of the information or data in this tool.

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