Publicly funded hospital discharges – 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015

Published online: 
27 October 2017

Summary

These tables contain summarised data showing publicly funded hospital discharges and procedures by DHB, ethnic group, sex, age group and disease/procedure classification. The data is provided in multiple formats:

Static tables: Formatted tables so you can view national data easily and read the key findings.
Pivot tables: Flexible tables that you can filter, manipulate and transform to do further analyses. DHB breakdowns are available in this format.
Data tables: Zip file package containing text files of the underlying data used in the pivot and static tables and a data dictionary.

The ‘Help’ sheet in the pivot tables file includes help on

  • how to choose the right file to use
  • what is the difference between discharges, discharges involving injury, and procedures
  • how to find the right clinical or procedure codes
  • how to get the number of hospital discharges associated with a condition
  • how to get the number of people on which a particular procedure was performed.

Key findings

Publicly funded hospital discharges in 2014/15

  • Over 1.1 million publicly funded hospital discharges were reported during 2014/15.
  • The age-standardised rate for 2014/15 was 227 hospitalisations per 1000 people, 13% higher than that for 2005/06.
  • 1 in 3 hospitalisations in 2014/15 were for people aged 65 years and over.
  • For both males and females, hospitalisation rates were highest in the 85+ years age group.
  • Females had a higher overall age-standardised rate, and higher age-specific rates during child-bearing years, compared with males.
  • Rates for both males and females have had a small but steady increase since 2005/06.
  • For every 100 hospital discharges in 2014/15, 16 were Māori.
  • The Māori rate fluctuated between 259 and 281 per 1000 people from 2005/06 to 2014/15.
  • Māori had a higher rate of hospitalisation than non-Māori each year since 2005/06, the Māori rate being 1.2–1.4 times the non-Māori rate.

Publicly funded hospital discharges involving unintentional and intentional injury in 2014/15

  • Over 200,000 publicly funded hospital discharges involving unintentional and intentional injury were reported during 2014/15.
  • The age-standardised rate for 2014/15 was 38 hospitalisations per 1000 people, the same as that for 2012/13 and 2013/14, and 18% higher than that for 2005/06.
  • 38% of hospitalisations involving injury in 2014/15 were for people aged 65 years and over.
  • For both males and females, hospitalisation rates involving injury increased with age, and were highest for the 85+ years age group.
  • Males had a higher overall age-standardised rate, and higher age-specific rates in almost all age groups, compared with females.
  • Rates for both males and females have had a small but steady increase since 2005/06.
  • For every 100 hospital discharges involving injury in 2014/15, 15 were Māori.
  • The Māori rate in 2014/15 was 18% higher than that in 2005/06.
  • Hospitalisations involving injury were more common among Māori than non-Māori, the Māori rate being 1.2–1.3 times the non-Māori rate from 2005/06 to 2014/15.

Publicly funded hospital procedures in 2014/15

  • Over 1.4 million publicly funded hospital procedures were reported during 2014/15.
  • The age-standardised rate for 2014/15 was 280 procedures per 1000 people, 6% higher than that for 2005/06.
  • 1 in 3 publicly funded hospital procedures performed in 2014/15 were for people aged 65 years and over.
  • For both males and females, procedure rates generally increased with age and were highest in the 85+ years age group for males and the 80–84 years age group for females.
  • Females had a higher overall age-standardised rate, and higher age-specific rates during child bearing years, compared with males.
  • Rates for both males and females had a small but steady increase from 2005/06 to 2013/14. Compared to 2013/14, rates for males and females were around 10% lower.
  • For every 100 hospital procedures performed in 2014/15, 15 were for Māori.
  • The Māori rate in 2014/15 was 6% lower than that in 2005/06.
  • Hospital procedures were more common among Māori than non-Māori, as the Māori rate was 1.2–1.3 times the non-Māori rate from 2005/06 to 2014/15.

Publishing information

Back to top