Mortality and Demographic Data 2005

Published online: 
02 March 2009

Summary

Annual statistical publication that collates and analyses information on the underlying causes of all deaths registered in New Zealand. The commentary summarises key facts, mortality rates, trends and major causes of death by age group and sex.

Please note that in this year’s edition of Mortality and Demographic Data the rates are calculated using the WHO world population. Previous editions employed Segi’s world population. Rates in the 2005 publication will not be compatible with those published in previous years.

Selected facts from the publication:

Major causes of mortality in 2005

  • There were 27,141 deaths registered in New Zealand in 2005. Compared to the equivalent period a decade ago (ie 1995), this represents a 2.9 percent decrease.
  • In 2005, females accounted for 153 more deaths (13,647 total female deaths; an age-standardised rate of 357.2 deaths per 100,000) than males (13,494 total male deaths; an age-standardised rate of 514.2).
  • There were 2712 Māori deaths in 2005 (1483 males, 1229 females), accounting for 10 percent of total deaths. This gives an age-standardised rate of 857.0 for Māori males and 646.0 for Māori females.

Selected trends

Cancer

  • There were 7971 deaths from cancer in 2005 (4184 males and 3787 females).
  • Cancer was the leading cause of death for both males and females in 2005.
  • The age-standardised rate of cancer death has shown a downward trend from 1987 to 2005, with a 21.1 percent decrease for males and 19.0 percent decrease for females over the period.
  • Males had a consistently higher age-standardised rate of cancer death over this time, and, in 2005, the male rate was 34.0 percent higher than the female rate.
  • The Māori population had a consistently higher rate of cancer death than the non-Māori population, and Māori males had a higher rate than Māori females. In 2005, the calculated Māori male rate was 55.6 percent higher than the non-Māori male rate.
  • Māori females had a calculated rate of cancer death that was 83.5 percent higher than the non-Māori female rate in 2005.

Ischaemic heart disease

  • Ischaemic heart disease was the second leading cause of death after cancer in 2005, with 5807 deaths. Males accounted for 52.6 percent of these deaths, but the male age-standardised rate was nearly twice the female rate in 2005.
  • In 2005, the calculated Māori male age-standardised rate of death from ischaemic heart disease was 87.8 percent higher than the non-Māori male rate, and the calculated Māori female rate was 102.9 percent higher than the non-Māori female rate.

Cerebrovascular disease

  • Cerebrovascular disease was the third leading cause of death in the total population in 2005, after cancer and ischaemic heart disease.
  • There were 2587 deaths from cerebrovascular disease in 2005 and the majority (63.7 percent) were female deaths.
  • Māori females had the highest age-standardised mortality rate of the four groups in 2005, followed by Māori males. The calculated Māori male age-standardised rate was 16.2 percent higher than the non-Māori male rate in 2005, and the calculated Māori female rate was 43.6 percent higher than the non-Māori female rate.

Diabetes mellitus

  • There were 839 deaths from diabetes mellitus in 2005, with slightly more male (53.3 percent) than female deaths.
  • The male age-standardised rate of death from diabetes has shown an upward trend from 1987 to 2005, with a 50.9 percent increase over the period. The female age-standardised rate over the same period increased by 27.7 percent.
  • Males had a consistently higher age-standardised rate of death from diabetes mellitus over this time, and, in 2005, the male rate was 54.0 percent higher than the female rate.
  • The calculated Māori male age-standardised rate of diabetes mellitus was 300 percent higher than the non-Māori male rate in 2005, and the calculated Māori female rate was 428 percent higher than the non-Māori female rate.

Note: This issue of Mortality and Demographic Data does not contain a full set of tables. The detailed statistical tables are provided in Excel files provided together in a ZIP file in the box above.

Errata for the 2005 print edition (changes are in bold)

p. 11, paragraph 3:
In 2005, Māori females had an age-standardised rate of death 94.3 percent higher than the non-Māori female rate (646.0 and 332.4 deaths per 100,000 population respectively).

p. 51, paragraph 4:
E-mail: data-enquiries@moh.govt.nz

The PDF version of the publication (provided in the box at the top of this page) incorporates these changes.

Publishing information

  • Date of publication:
    02 March 2009
  • Hardcopy date of publication:
    02 March 2009
  • ISBN:
    978-0-478-30796-2 (print), 978-0-478-30799-3 (online)
  • Citation:
    Ministry of Health. 2009. Mortality and Demographic Data 2005. Wellington: Ministry of Health.
  • Ordering information:
    Only soft copy available to download
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