Impact of Marketing, Advertising and Sponsorship on Gambling behaviour

Research organisation: Schottler Consulting
Primary contact: Sarah Hare

Contract value: $207,200 (excl GST)
Contract start date: 20 May 2010
Contract end date: January 2012

Summary of project/aims

The Ministry expects this piece of research to explore the following questions;

  • What effect does marketing (including advertising, sponsorship or promotion) of gambling have on public views and attitudes regarding the desirability of gambling and the attractiveness of participating?
  • How do the marketing and promotional strategies used by different gambling industries, such as advertising, marketing, host responsibility initiatives or sponsorship both internal to venues (eg, use of culturally specific imagery in venues) and external to gambling venues (eg, sponsorship of community events)
  • What forms of marketing and promotional activities are more influential in creating safe gambling environments?
  • What forms of marketing and promotional activities are more strongly associated with the establishment of harmful gambling behaviours?
  • What international guidelines, codes of conducts and standards relating to the advertising, marketing and sponsorship of gambling – particularly in relation to Asian (such as Chinese and Korean) and Pacific populations – may be relevant to supporting and encouraging safe gambling in specific venues in New Zealand?
  • What forms of marketing and promotional activities are appropriate and effective for supporting and encouraging safe gambling in specific venues (ie, Class four venues, casinos)?
  • What role does marketing have on rates of participation in gambling?
  • What role does marketing have on the incidence of at-risk and problem gambling?
  • Is there a relationship between gamblers awareness/recall of gambling marketing and level of gambling problems/harm or awareness of harm?
  • Does the marketing of large lottery jackpots encourage people to spend more on lotteries than they usually do?

Final report

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