Rheumatic fever resources for health professionals

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Recommended first-line treatment for group A streptococcus pharyngitis

The Rheumatic Fever Prevention Programme recommends the following antibiotics for the treatment of  Group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children at high risk of rheumatic fever (Māori and Pacific children and young people living in high risk areas of the North Island):

Table 1: Recommended regimen for oral or intramuscular antibiotics for treatment of GAS pharyngitis

First line treatment
Amoxicillin orally for 10 days Children < 30 kg: 750 mg once daily
Children ≥ 30 kg: 1000 mg once daily
or
Benzathine benzylpenicillin, intramuscular, single dose Children < 30 kg: 450 mg (600,000 units)
Children ≥ 30 kg: 900 mg (1,200,000 units)
Alternative for definite or possible anaphylaxis to penicillin or amoxicillin
Erythromycin ethyl succinate orally for 10 days Children and adults: 40 mg/kg/day in 2–3 divided doses

E-learning course

A rheumatic fever e-learning course is available at LearnOnline.  The course is free, and is aimed at primary care nurses, public health nurses and community health workers who work with families whose children are at risk of developing rheumatic fever.

Guidance for administering an intramuscular injection of benzathine benzylpenicillin

This guidance provides a standardised protocol for administering intramuscular penicillin (benzathine benzylpenicillin), with lignocaine added for pain relief, to treat group A streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis.

When using this guidance, registered health professionals remain responsible for ensuring their practice is up to date and informed by current evidence and individual patient assessment.

Note: 'Lignocaine' is referred to in this guidance. 'Lignocaine' is another name for 'lidocaine'.

Information sheet: Treating a sore throat with a single penicillin injection

You can give this information sheet to people who have agreed to have intramuscular penicillin, with lignocaine added for pain relief, to treat group A streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis. It explains the injection process and what to expect after the injection is given. It also allows the health professional to record the antibiotic injection time and dose for the patient’s information.

Health education resources

Health education resources in various languages that explain rheumatic fever and the importance of getting a sore throat check.

Visual aid

English version of the visual guideThe visual aid shows how a sore throat can progress to rheumatic fever and heart disease, and how this compares with a successful treatment.

Family guide

Cover of English version of the family guide booklet The family guides explain sore throats and rheumatic fever. 

Key tips for a warmer, drier home

This toolkit, which consists of videos and a set of cards, gives key tips on how to create a warmer, drier home.

These tips will help you to shape your conversations with families, so they can keep their homes warmer and drier and prevent germs from spreading.

You can choose which tips to share, depending on the families you work with, and the relationships you have with them.

Cards

Tool kit training material

The resources below are available to support trainers and providers using the delivery of Key tips for a warmer drier home.

Videos

English

[Fesili] What does Aiga mean to me?

[Noelini] Famili to me is everything.

[Fesili] My Aiga means my heart.

[Margaret] Everything we do, sort of within the community is with the Whānau and all.

[Noelini] It’s about hanging out together through the tears and the smiles and supporting our kids.

[Margaret] Our boys love fishing along with my partner.

[Fesili] Swimming, going to the parks.

[Margaret] Everything together, all as one.

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home.

[Margaret standing outside her house]

Kia ora, my name is Margaret Walker, Haki and I have owned this house for 10 years and we’ve got 4 children. We try our best to keep our home warm and dry in the colder months to stop the kids from getting sick and there’s a few things that we do within the home to do that so nau mai ki tōku whare [come on into my house] and we'll go and wake up the kids.

[Margaret walks inside]

[Margaret walks into her daughter’s bedroom]

So this is our daughter Shahlin’s room.

Come on, time to get up.

[Margaret walks into her son’s bedroom]

This is where our boys’ room is. Morning guys, come on, get out of bed, good boy.

So we sleep them on their own beds, on the bunks at opposite ends and on the single bed, obviously at their own end, just to give them their own headspace, so that if they're coughing and sneezing throughout the night they are not doing it all over one another.

Get up, time to get up, open your guys’ curtains.

[Margaret son’s open the bedroom curtains]

 

We make it their job to open the curtains and windows in the morning. The good thing about opening your curtains during the day is that it allows the sun to heat your home for free.

[Margaret in the living area]

So up here we have a heat pump, which has a thermostat in it, which is really great, it doesn’t cost as much to use as other heaters do, which is really good for us.

Let’s go get some breakfast ready, eh?

[In the kitchen, Margaret’s partner and kids get breakfast ready]

[Margaret wipes condensation off the windows]

So sometimes after a cold night the water gets on the windows and walls so you can wipe them off with a cloth just so the house doesn’t stay cold and damp. Damp air is more expensive to heat so when your house is drier, it's cheaper and easier to heat.

[Margaret’s daughter grabs the used cloth]

Thank you.

Everyday we open up a couple of windows to let some fresh air in.

So why do you think we open the windows, son?

[Margaret’s son] To let the fresh air in and keep the house healthy

[Margaret] Good boy.

So a few months ago Dylan was tested for strep throat, we think it may have been from them sleeping too close together, it could’ve led to rheumatic fever.

So after that we come home and sort of sat down and had a think about things, as to how we can change to make our house warmer, drier and healthier for everybody, and that’s how we like to roll.

[Title] Sleeping space

[Still image of Margaret’s son’s in their beds]

[Voice over] Kids cough and sneeze out germs when they sleep so create as much space as possible between their heads to make it harder for the germs to spread.

[Title] Curtains

[Still image of Margaret’s son opening the curtains]

Curtains - open them during the day to let the sun’s heat in, close them just before sunset to keep the cold night air out.

If you choose to use alternatives like sheets or lavalava make sure you have a snug fit around the windowframe.

You might be able to get curtains free or cheaply from your local curtain bank.

[Title] Heating

[Still images of electric heater, heat pump, Margaret using a heat pump remote]

The right heater for your home can make it easier and cheaper to heat.

A thermostat keeps the costs down, and your home comfortable 20 degrees is nice and warm when you’re up, and turn it down to 16 in the bedrooms at night

[Title] Wipe off condensation

[Still image of Margaret wiping condensation from window]

Condensation, or water that has collected on windows and walls, makes rooms feel damp and can cause mould to grow.

To help keep your home dry, wipe it off when you see it.

A dry home is easier and cheaper to heat.

[Title] Open windows

[Still images of opening windows]

Open your windows for at least 20 minutes on fine days and a few minutes every day in winter.

Bringing fresh air into your home is another great way to help keep your home dry.

[Fesili standing outside her house]

[Fesili] O lo’u igoa o Fesili. [My name is Fesili]

O le igoa o lo’u tamā o Melie. [My father’s name is Melie]

O le igoa o lo’u tinā o Falefā. [My mother’s name is Falefā]

My husband and I have been living here for 3 years and we have 7 children

To’afitu lo’u fānau. [I have seven children]

[Fesili’s children running up the hallway]

[Fesili’s son getting out of the shower]

You all right there son?

As you can see, it doesn’t take that much to steam up in here, so I just turn on the extractor fan and I open the window a little bit to let the steam out.

You can go and put your ofu on now and get ready for school.

[Fesili in the kitchen]

It's also very important to open your windows or fa’aaoga extractor fan if you have one as it helps steamy areas from getting damp and mouldy.

[Fesili’s daughter removing the gas heater]

We used to have our portable gas heater, which we no longer use because of its dangerous fumes and it was making our fale damp, but now we have this electric heater and it's much safer and cheaper to use.

Another thing that is helpful is having insulation in your home.

E māfanafana lo’u fale [My house is warm] in winter and it also helps you save money on heating.

[Title] Reduce steam

[Still images of Fesili and her kids opening the windows]

[Voice over] To help prevent dampness and mould, open windows in the kitchen when you cook and in the bathroom when you take a shower or bath, to let steam out.

[Still image turning on the extractor fan on the oven]

Make sure you use your kitchen and bathroom extractor fans if you have them.

[Title] Heating

To keep your home warm, choose a heater that is safe and efficient to run.

[Still image of an electric heater and a still image of a gas heater with a big X through it]

Portable gas heaters are expensive to run, create dampness and give out dangerous fumes.

[Title] Insulation

[Still image of insulation in the ceiling]

Insulation is one of the best ways to keep your home warm. Find out if you have it installed.

If you don’t, you may qualify to get it in your home for free.

Speak to EECA, your council or your landlord to check your options.

[Noelini standing outside her house]

[Noelini] Malo e lelei. My name is Noelini

I’m from Kolonga, Tongatapu. My mali  and I, Paola we've been living here in this home for approximately 14 years.

[Noelini inside her house with her husband Paul and kids]

This is my lounge and this is where we all like to hang out during the evenings.

This is my husband Paul and these are my beautiful children.

[Noelini sits infront of the door]

The problem with this room is that there is cold air that comes down through the bottom here, and how I fix that is by getting a draft stopper, and placing it there to stop the cold air from coming through.

[Noelini places a draft stopper against the door]

If you don’t have a draft stopper, you can roll up a dry towel and place it there, and that will stop the draft from coming in.

It’s really important to stop the drafts from coming under the door and through the windows because it helps to keep our house warm.

[Noelini walks into the bathroom]

Something that likes damp areas is mould, it builds up around the windows and on the walls.

As soon as you see it, it's really important to clean it off straight away.

[Noelini mixes up a mould cleaning solution]

To make up the solution you just add one capful of bleach to every litre of water.

If you don’t have bleach, you can also use vinegar to get rid of the mould.

[Noelini wipes down the walls in the bathroom]

Whatever you use, leave it on for about 15 minutes and rinse it off with warm soapy water.

[Noelini bringing in the washing off the line]

When you can, hang your washing out in the sun or in the carport, garage that way it will keep your house dry and it will be less expensive to heat.

So there you go, those are a few things we do to keep our house warm and dry.

[Margaret and her son’s enter the living area of their house]

All right guys, bags off please.

[Margaret and her son’s close the curtains]

Remember to always close your curtains at night and get that heating going

Well done boys.

[Title] Stop draughts

[Voice over] To stop cold air getting into your home, stop draughts around doors, windows and fireplaces.

[Still image of door stopper being placed below door]

Use a draught stopper or an old rolled-up towel.

[Still image of weather stripping being installed around windows/doors]

You can buy weather stripping to stop draughts around windows from hardware stores.

[Title] Remove mould

Bleach or white vinegar will remove mould from ceilings and walls.

[Still image of mould cleaning solution being mixed up]

[Still image of mould on the wall]

Mould grows in damp and wet places and can affect your family’s health.

[Title] Dry washing outside

[Still images of washing being hung outside]

To help keep the damp out of your home, dry your washing outside, or in the garage or carport.

[Margaret, Fesili & Noelini’s families outside their respective houses]

This is how we roll!

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home

[Voice over] Each of these key tips will help to keep your home warmer, drier, and healthier for your family, and reduce the cost of heating.

Thank you to all the wonderful organisations, families and individuals who helped develop this video.

[Still image listing organisations who have helped ]

Sore throats can lead to rheumatic fever and heart damage

Every time your child has a sore throat, please, get them checked by a doctor or nurse as soon as possible.

If they’re given antibiotics, make sure they take them for the full 10 days, even if they feel better.

If you’re not sure what to do, call Healthline for advice.

For more information about preventing rheumatic fever visit this website [health.govt.nz/rheumaticfever].

 

Māori & English

[Fesili] What does Aiga mean to me?

[Noelini] Famili to me is everything.

[Fesili] My Aiga means my heart.

[Margaret] Everything we do, sort of within the community is with the Whānau and all.

[Noelini] It’s about hanging out together through the tears and the smiles and supporting our kids.

[Margaret] Our boys love fishing along with my partner.

[Fesili] Swimming, going to the parks.

[Margaret] Everything together, all as one.

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home.

[Margaret standing outside her house]

Kia ora, my name is Margaret Walker, Haki and I have owned this house for 10 years and we’ve got 4 children. We try our best to keep our home warm and dry in the colder months to stop the kids from getting sick and there’s a few things that we do within the home to do that so nau mai ki tōku whare [come on into my house] and we'll go and wake up the kids.

[Margaret walks inside]

[Margaret walks into her daughter’s bedroom]

So this is our daughter Shahlin’s room.

Come on, time to get up.

[Margaret walks into her son’s bedroom]

This is where our boys’ room is. Morning guys, come on, get out of bed, good boy.

So we sleep them on their own beds, on the bunks at opposite ends and on the single bed, obviously at their own end, just to give them their own headspace, so that if they're coughing and sneezing throughout the night they are not doing it all over one another.

Get up, time to get up, open your guys’ curtains.

[Margaret son’s open the bedroom curtains]

 

We make it their job to open the curtains and windows in the morning. The good thing about opening your curtains during the day is that it allows the sun to heat your home for free.

[Margaret in the living area]

So up here we have a heat pump, which has a thermostat in it, which is really great, it doesn’t cost as much to use as other heaters do, which is really good for us.

Let’s go get some breakfast ready, eh?

[In the kitchen, Margaret’s partner and kids get breakfast ready]

[Margaret wipes condensation off the windows]

So sometimes after a cold night the water gets on the windows and walls so you can wipe them off with a cloth just so the house doesn’t stay cold and damp. Damp air is more expensive to heat so when your house is drier, it's cheaper and easier to heat.

[Margaret’s daughter grabs the used cloth]

Thank you.

Everyday we open up a couple of windows to let some fresh air in.

So why do you think we open the windows, son?

[Margaret’s son] To let the fresh air in and keep the house healthy

[Margaret] Good boy.

So a few months ago Dylan was tested for strep throat, we think it may have been from them sleeping too close together, it could’ve led to rheumatic fever.

So after that we come home and sort of sat down and had a think about things, as to how we can change to make our house warmer, drier and healthier for everybody, and that’s how we like to roll.

[Title] Sleeping space

[Still image of Margaret’s son’s in their beds]

[Voice over] Ka maremare, ka matihe hoki ngā tamariki i a rātou e moe ana, nā reira meatia he wāhi wātea tonu i waenga i ngā māhunga kia kore e hōrapa ai ngā meroiti.

[Title] Curtains

[Still image of Margaret’s son opening the curtains]

Ngā Ārai - whakatuwheratia ngā ārai i te awatea hei urunga mō ngā hihi mahana o te rā. Katia anō i mua i te tōnga o te rā hei ārai atu i te makariri o te pō.

Ki te whakamahi koe i ētahi mea pērā i te hīti, i te lava lava rānei, me whai kia piri tonu ki ngā tāpare matapihi.

Tērā pea ka taea ētahi ārai utu iti, utu kōre rānei mai i te whare kohinga ārai o tō hapori.

[Title] Heating

[Still images of electric heater, heat pump, Margaret using a heat pump remote]

Ka tika te pūrere whakamahana, tērā ka māmā ake te whakamahana i tō whare, ā, ka iti iho te utu.

Mā te whakaū mahana e iti iho te utu, ā, e noho āhuru ai tō whare.

Ko te 20 te pāmahana pai i te awatea, heoi i te pō meatia kia 16 te pāmahana i ngā rūma moe.

[Title] Wipe off condensation

[Still image of Margaret wiping condensation from window]

Mā te tōtā, arā, te wai kua piri ki ngā matapihi me ngā pakitara, e haukū ai ngā rūma, tērā ka tipu mai te pūhekaheka.

Hei āwhina kia noho maroke tō whare, me muku ina kitea e koe. He māmā ake te whakamahana i te whare maroke, ā, he iti anō te utu.

[Title] Open windows

[Still images of opening windows]

Whakatuwheratia ngā matapihi mō te 20 meneti te itinga rawa i ngā rā paki, ā, mō ētahi meneti noa iho i ngā rā o te takurua.

Ko te urunga mai o te hau pūangi ki tō whare, tētahi tikanga pai kia noho maroke ai tō whare.

[Fesili standing outside her house]

[Fesili] O lo’u igoa o Fesili. [My name is Fesili]

O le igoa o lo’u tamā o Melie. [My father’s name is Melie]

O le igoa o lo’u tinā o Falefā. [My mother’s name is Falefā]

My husband and I have been living here for 3 years and we have 7 children

To’afitu lo’u fānau. [I have seven children]

[Fesili’s children running up the hallway]

[Fesili’s son getting out of the shower]

You all right there son?

As you can see, it doesn’t take that much to steam up in here, so I just turn on the extractor fan and I open the window a little bit to let the steam out.

You can go and put your ofu on now and get ready for school.

[Fesili in the kitchen]

It's also very important to open your windows or fa’aaoga extractor fan if you have one as it helps steamy areas from getting damp and mouldy.

[Fesili’s daughter removing the gas heater]

We used to have our portable gas heater, which we no longer use because of its dangerous fumes and it was making our fale damp, but now we have this electric heater and it's much safer and cheaper to use.

Another thing that is helpful is having insulation in your home.

E māfanafana lo’u fale [My house is warm] in winter and it also helps you save money on heating.

[Title] Reduce steam

[Still images of Fesili and her kids opening the windows]

[Voice over] Hei ārai atu i te haukū me te pūhekaheka, whakatuwheratia ngā matapihi o te kīhini mō te wā tunu kai. ā, me pērā anō i te rūma kaukau mō te wā tāuwhiuwhi, kaukau rānei hei putanga atu mō te korohū.

[Still image turning on the extractor fan on the oven]

Me whai tonu koe ki te whakamahi i te pūrere kapehau i roto i tō kīhini, i tō rūma kaukau rānei mēnā kei reira tētahi.

[Title] Heating

[Still image of an electric heater and a still image of a gas heater with a big X through it]

Hei whakamahana i tō whare me kōwhiri tētahi pūrere whakamahana, he mea haumaru, he mea mahi tōtika hoki. Ko ngā pūrere whakamahana kapuni kawekawe ngā momo he nui te  te utu, he mea whakahaukū, whakaputa au mōrearea hoki.

[Title] Insulation

[Still image of insulation in the ceiling]

Ko te āraitanga tētahi tikanga pai rawa hei whakamahana i tō whare. Me ui atu koe kia mōhio mēnā kua oti kē te whakauru pareārai ki tō whare. Ina kore, tērā ka whakaaetia kia āraia tō whare mō te kore utu.

Kōrero atu ki EECA, ki tō kaunihera, ki te rāngatira o tō whare rānei kia mōhiotia ngā kōwhiringa mōu.

[Noelini standing outside her house]

[Noelini] Malo e lelei. My name is Noelini

I’m from Kolonga, Tongatapu. My mali  and I, Paola we've been living here in this home for approximately 14 years.

[Noelini inside her house with her husband Paul and kids]

This is my lounge and this is where we all like to hang out during the evenings.

This is my husband Paul and these are my beautiful children.

[Noelini sits infront of the door]

The problem with this room is that there is cold air that comes down through the bottom here, and how I fix that is by getting a draft stopper, and placing it there to stop the cold air from coming through.

[Noelini places a draft stopper against the door]

If you don’t have a draft stopper, you can roll up a dry towel and place it there, and that will stop the draft from coming in.

It’s really important to stop the drafts from coming under the door and through the windows because it helps to keep our house warm.

[Noelini walks into the bathroom]

Something that likes damp areas is mould, it builds up around the windows and on the walls.

As soon as you see it, it's really important to clean it off straight away.

[Noelini mixes up a mould cleaning solution]

To make up the solution you just add one capful of bleach to every litre of water.

If you don’t have bleach, you can also use vinegar to get rid of the mould.

[Noelini wipes down the walls in the bathroom]

Whatever you use, leave it on for about 15 minutes and rinse it off with warm soapy water.

[Noelini bringing in the washing off the line]

When you can, hang your washing out in the sun or in the carport, garage that way it will keep your house dry and it will be less expensive to heat.

So there you go, those are a few things we do to keep our house warm and dry.

[Margaret and her son’s enter the living area of their house]

All right guys, bags off please.

[Margaret and her son’s close the curtains]

Remember to always close your curtains at night and get that heating going

Well done boys.

[Title] Stop draughts

[Voice over] To stop cold air getting into your home, stop draughts around doors, windows and fireplaces.

[Still image of door stopper being placed below door]

Hei kati i te urunga mai o te hau mātao me whakapuru i ngā puare huri rauna i ngā tatau, ngā matapihi me ngā pākaiahi. 

Pōkaitia he taora tawhito hei whakapuru hau.

[Still image of weather stripping being installed around windows/doors]

Ka taea ngā tiri huarere te hoko mai i ngā toa taputapu kāinga hei aukati i ngā hau mātao.

[Title] Remove mould

Mā te whakatoki, mā te winika mā rānei e tango  te pūhekaheka i te tuanui, i ngā pakitara hoki.

[Still image of mould cleaning solution being mixed up]

[Still image of mould on the wall]

Tipu ai te pūhekaheka i ngā wāhi haukū, wāhi mākū hoki, ā, ka pā ki te oranga o te whānau.

[Title] Dry washing outside

[Still images of washing being hung outside]

Hei ārai i te haukū i tō whare, whakamaroketia ngā kākahu ki waho, ki roto rānei i te whare motokā.

[Margaret, Fesili & Noelini’s families outside their respective houses]

This is how we roll!

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home

[Voice over] Each of these key tips will help to keep your home warmer, drier, and healthier for your family, and reduce the cost of heating

[Still image listing organisations who have helped ]

Ngā mihi nui ki te hunga nāna nei i tautoko mai, i āwhina mai kia whanake te rauemi nei, rōpū mai, whānau mai, tāngata takitahi mai, tēnā rawa atu koutou katoa.

Sore throats can lead to rheumatic fever and heart damage

Every time your child has a sore throat, please, get them checked by a doctor or nurse as soon as possible.

If they’re given antibiotics, make sure they take them for the full 10 days, even if they feel better.

If you’re not sure what to do, call Healthline for advice.

For more information about preventing rheumatic fever visit this website [health.govt.nz/rheumaticfever].

 

Samoan & English

[Fesili] What does Aiga mean to me?

[Noelini] Famili to me is everything.

[Fesili] My Aiga means my heart.

[Margaret] Everything we do, sort of within the community is with the Whānau and all.

[Noelini] It’s about hanging out together through the tears and the smiles and supporting our kids.

[Margaret] Our boys love fishing along with my partner.

[Fesili] Swimming, going to the parks.

[Margaret] Everything together, all as one.

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home.

[Margaret standing outside her house]

Kia ora, my name is Margaret Walker, Haki and I have owned this house for 10 years and we’ve got 4 children. We try our best to keep our home warm and dry in the colder months to stop the kids from getting sick and there’s a few things that we do within the home to do that so nau mai ki tōku whare [come on into my house] and we'll go and wake up the kids.

[Margaret walks inside]

[Margaret walks into her daughter’s bedroom]

So this is our daughter Shahlin’s room.

Come on, time to get up.

[Margaret walks into her son’s bedroom]

This is where our boys’ room is. Morning guys, come on, get out of bed, good boy.

So we sleep them on their own beds, on the bunks at opposite ends and on the single bed, obviously at their own end, just to give them their own headspace, so that if they're coughing and sneezing throughout the night they are not doing it all over one another.

Get up, time to get up, open your guys’ curtains.

[Margaret son’s open the bedroom curtains]

 

We make it their job to open the curtains and windows in the morning. The good thing about opening your curtains during the day is that it allows the sun to heat your home for free.

[Margaret in the living area]

So up here we have a heat pump, which has a thermostat in it, which is really great, it doesn’t cost as much to use as other heaters do, which is really good for us.

Let’s go get some breakfast ready, eh?

[In the kitchen, Margaret’s partner and kids get breakfast ready]

[Margaret wipes condensation off the windows]

So sometimes after a cold night the water gets on the windows and walls so you can wipe them off with a cloth just so the house doesn’t stay cold and damp. Damp air is more expensive to heat so when your house is drier, it's cheaper and easier to heat.

[Margaret’s daughter grabs the used cloth]

Thank you.

Everyday we open up a couple of windows to let some fresh air in.

So why do you think we open the windows, son?

[Margaret’s son] To let the fresh air in and keep the house healthy

[Margaret] Good boy.

So a few months ago Dylan was tested for strep throat, we think it may have been from them sleeping too close together, it could’ve led to rheumatic fever.

So after that we come home and sort of sat down and had a think about things, as to how we can change to make our house warmer, drier and healthier for everybody, and that’s how we like to roll.

[Title] Sleeping space

[Still image of Margaret’s son’s in their beds]

[Voice over] O tamaiti fetalei ma mafatua e lē pupunia gutu pe ‘ā momoe e sau le siama i fafo ma salalau solo.  Ia telē se avanoa e talafeagai lelei i le va o ulu o tamaiti pe ‘ā momoe.  O le vāvā mamao o latou ulu o le faigatā fo’i lea o le pipisi o siama.

[Title] Curtains

[Still image of Margaret’s son opening the curtains]

Toso i tua pupuni pe ‘ā ao fa’aalu le vevela o le la i totonu, ‘ae toso i totonu ‘ae le’i goto le la ina ia ‘aua ne’i sao i totonu le ‘ea ma le sau mālūlū o le po.

Pe ‘ā e filifili e fesuia’i le fa’aogaina o le ‘ie po’o se ‘ie lavalava, ia mautinoa ia fetaui lelei i le fa’amalama ina ia māfanafana ai.

Atonu e mafai ona e maua fua ni pupuni po’o le maua fo’i i se tau taugofie, mai i se fale pupuni i lō outou vai’a’ai.

[Title] Heating

[Still images of electric heater, heat pump, Margaret using a heat pump remote]

O le ta’igaāfi lea (heater) e sili ona lelei mo lō outou fale e faigofie ma taugofie lona fa’amāfanafanaina.

O le masini lea o le thermostat po’o le mea faigaluega e fa’amāfanafanaina lou fale e fesoasoani tele i le fa’ataugofieina, ae fa’apea fo’i le mālū ma le nofogōfie o lou fale.

E 20 tikeli le lelei ma le māfanafana pe’ā e ala, ae ki i lalo i le 16 tikeli i lou potu moe i le po.

[Title] Wipe off condensation

[Still image of Margaret wiping condensation from window]

O le susū, vaia ma le ausa, po’o le vai lea ua ao fa’atasi i luga o fa’amalama ma puipui, ua fai ma mea ua susū ai potu, ua legalegā ma taetaepaloloa.

Vaai lō outou fale ia malupuipuia mātūtū, leai se susū, solo ‘ese susū ma ni mea o lo’o e iloa e tatau ona ‘ave ‘ese.  O le fale e mātūtū, leai se susū e faigofie ma taugofie lona fa’amāfanafanaina.

[Title] Open windows

[Still images of opening windows]

Talai fa’amalama o le tou fale ia lē i lalo ifo o le 20 minute i aso laofie e leai se timu, ma ni nai minute e talai ai i aso uma o le tau mālūlū.

O le fa’aaluina o le ‘ea fou i totonu o lō outou fale, o le isi ‘auala sili lea e fesoasoani ai i le malupuipuia o lō outou fale ia mātūtū, leai se susū.

[Fesili standing outside her house]

[Fesili] O lo’u igoa o Fesili. [My name is Fesili]

O le igoa o lo’u tamā o Melie. [My father’s name is Melie]

O le igoa o lo’u tinā o Falefā. [My mother’s name is Falefā]

My husband and I have been living here for 3 years and we have 7 children

To’afitu lo’u fānau. [I have seven children]

[Fesili’s children running up the hallway]

[Fesili’s son getting out of the shower]

You all right there son?

As you can see, it doesn’t take that much to steam up in here, so I just turn on the extractor fan and I open the window a little bit to let the steam out.

You can go and put your ofu on now and get ready for school.

[Fesili in the kitchen]

It's also very important to open your windows or fa’aaoga extractor fan if you have one as it helps steamy areas from getting damp and mouldy.

[Fesili’s daughter removing the gas heater]

We used to have our portable gas heater, which we no longer use because of its dangerous fumes and it was making our fale damp, but now we have this electric heater and it's much safer and cheaper to use.

Another thing that is helpful is having insulation in your home.

E māfanafana lo’u fale [My house is warm] in winter and it also helps you save money on heating.

[Title] Reduce steam

[Still images of Fesili and her kids opening the windows]

[Voice over] O le fesoasoani i le puipuiga o le susū, legalegā ma taetaepaloloa, talai fa’amalama i le umukuka pe ‘ā e kuka, ma totonu o le fale tā’ele pe ‘ā efaamālū, ia fa’aalu le ausa i fafo.

[Still image turning on the extractor fan on the oven]

Ia mautinoa lou fa’aaogāina o le ili pe ‘āfai o iai, i totonu o lō outou umukuka ma le fale tā’ele.

[Title] Heating

[Still image of an electric heater and a still image of a gas heater with a big X through it]

Ia lelei le fa’amāfanafanaina o lō outou fale.  Va’ai se heater e saogalemū ma lelei.  O le heater e alu i le fagu kesi, e mafai ona fe’avea’i e taugata ma faigatā le fa’aaogāina, e fa’ateleina ai le susū ma e iai tulaga faigatā e tatau ona fa’aeteete ai pei o le asu oona.

[Title] Insulation

[Still image of insulation in the ceiling]

Mea e fa’amafanafana ai totonu o le fale.

O le fa’amāfanafanaina o totonu o lou fale o le tasi lea auala sili e māfanafana ai lo outou fale.  Va’ai po ua iai ni mea e fa’amāfanafana ai lō outou fale.  Afai e le’i faia ua tatau ona faiā loa lea fa’amāfanafanaga mo lou fale e leai se totogi.

Talanoa i le EECA, le puleganu’u (city council) po’o lau landlord e uiga i le fa’amāfanafanaina o lou fale.

[Noelini standing outside her house]

[Noelini] Malo e lelei. My name is Noelini

I’m from Kolonga, Tongatapu. My mali  and I, Paola we've been living here in this home for approximately 14 years.

[Noelini inside her house with her husband Paul and kids]

This is my lounge and this is where we all like to hang out during the evenings.

This is my husband Paul and these are my beautiful children.

[Noelini sits infront of the door]

The problem with this room is that there is cold air that comes down through the bottom here, and how I fix that is by getting a draft stopper, and placing it there to stop the cold air from coming through.

[Noelini places a draft stopper against the door]

If you don’t have a draft stopper, you can roll up a dry towel and place it there, and that will stop the draft from coming in.

It’s really important to stop the drafts from coming under the door and through the windows because it helps to keep our house warm.

[Noelini walks into the bathroom]

Something that likes damp areas is mould, it builds up around the windows and on the walls.

As soon as you see it, it's really important to clean it off straight away.

[Noelini mixes up a mould cleaning solution]

To make up the solution you just add one capful of bleach to every litre of water.

If you don’t have bleach, you can also use vinegar to get rid of the mould.

[Noelini wipes down the walls in the bathroom]

Whatever you use, leave it on for about 15 minutes and rinse it off with warm soapy water.

[Noelini bringing in the washing off the line]

When you can, hang your washing out in the sun or in the carport, garage that way it will keep your house dry and it will be less expensive to heat.

So there you go, those are a few things we do to keep our house warm and dry.

[Margaret and her son’s enter the living area of their house]

All right guys, bags off please.

[Margaret and her son’s close the curtains]

Remember to always close your curtains at night and get that heating going

Well done boys.

[Title] Stop draughts

[Voice over] ‘Aua ne’i sao se ‘ea mālūlū i totonu o lō outou fale, ‘aua fo’i ne’i sao le savili po’o alāmatagi i lalo o faitoto’a ma fa’amalama ma ta’igaāfi (fireplace).

[Still image of door stopper being placed below door]

Tu’u se solo i lalo o faitoto’a ma fa’amalama e pupuni ai le ‘ea mālūlū.

[Still image of weather stripping being installed around windows/doors]

E mafai ona e fa’atau mai i le fale’oloa hardware le solo e fa’apitoa lava i le sologa o le susū o fa’amalama.

[Title] Remove mould

‘Ave’ese lega ma taetaepaloloa.

Fa’aaogā le vinika pa’epa’e e ‘ave’ese mai ai lega ma taepaloloa mai le fā’alo ma puipui o le fale.

[Still image of mould cleaning solution being mixed up]

[Still image of mould on the wall]

O lega ma taetaepaloloa e tutupu i mea susū ma e mafai ona afāina ai le soifua mālōlōina o lou ‘āiga.

[Title] Dry washing outside

[Still images of washing being hung outside]

‘Ave’ese le susū mai lō outou fale, fa’amamago lau tagāmea i fafo po’o totonu o le fale ta’avale.

[Margaret, Fesili & Noelini’s families outside their respective houses]

This is how we roll!

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home

[Voice over] Each of these key tips will help to keep your home warmer, drier, and healthier for your family, and reduce the cost of heating.

Thank you to all the wonderful organisations, families and individuals who helped develop this video.

Sore throats can lead to rheumatic fever and heart damage.

Every time your child has a sore throat, please, get them checked by a doctor or nurse as soon as possible.

If they’re given antibiotics, make sure they take them for the full 10 days, even if they feel better.

If you’re not sure what to do, call Healthline for advice.

For more information about preventing rheumatic fever visit this website [health.govt.nz/rheumaticfever].

 

Tongan & English

[Fesili] What does Aiga mean to me?

[Noelini] Famili to me is everything.

[Fesili] My Aiga means my heart.

[Margaret] Everything we do, sort of within the community is with the Whānau and all.

[Noelini] It’s about hanging out together through the tears and the smiles and supporting our kids.

[Margaret] Our boys love fishing along with my partner.

[Fesili] Swimming, going to the parks.

[Margaret] Everything together, all as one.

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home.

[Margaret standing outside her house]

Kia ora, my name is Margaret Walker, Haki and I have owned this house for 10 years and we’ve got 4 children. We try our best to keep our home warm and dry in the colder months to stop the kids from getting sick and there’s a few things that we do within the home to do that so nau mai ki tōku whare [come on into my house] and we'll go and wake up the kids.

[Margaret walks inside]

[Margaret walks into her daughter’s bedroom]

So this is our daughter Shahlin’s room.

Come on, time to get up.

[Margaret walks into her son’s bedroom]

This is where our boys’ room is. Morning guys, come on, get out of bed, good boy.

So we sleep them on their own beds, on the bunks at opposite ends and on the single bed, obviously at their own end, just to give them their own headspace, so that if they're coughing and sneezing throughout the night they are not doing it all over one another.

Get up, time to get up, open your guys’ curtains.

[Margaret son’s open the bedroom curtains]

 

We make it their job to open the curtains and windows in the morning. The good thing about opening your curtains during the day is that it allows the sun to heat your home for free.

[Margaret in the living area]

So up here we have a heat pump, which has a thermostat in it, which is really great, it doesn’t cost as much to use as other heaters do, which is really good for us.

Let’s go get some breakfast ready, eh?

[In the kitchen, Margaret’s partner and kids get breakfast ready]

[Margaret wipes condensation off the windows]

So sometimes after a cold night the water gets on the windows and walls so you can wipe them off with a cloth just so the house doesn’t stay cold and damp. Damp air is more expensive to heat so when your house is drier, it's cheaper and easier to heat.

[Margaret’s daughter grabs the used cloth]

Thank you.

Everyday we open up a couple of windows to let some fresh air in.

So why do you think we open the windows, son?

[Margaret’s son] To let the fresh air in and keep the house healthy

[Margaret] Good boy.

So a few months ago Dylan was tested for strep throat, we think it may have been from them sleeping too close together, it could’ve led to rheumatic fever.

So after that we come home and sort of sat down and had a think about things, as to how we can change to make our house warmer, drier and healthier for everybody, and that’s how we like to roll.

[Title] Sleeping space

[Still image of Margaret’s son’s in their beds]

[Voice over] ‘I he lolotonga mohe ‘a e fānau, te nau mafatua mo tae ‘o lava mafola ai ‘a e siemu. Fakamavahevahe’i honau ‘ulu telia na’a nau pihia ‘i ha mafola atu ‘a e siemu.

[Title] Curtains

[Still image of Margaret’s son opening the curtains]

Ko e puipui – toho ke ava ke māfana ‘a fale mei he la’aá pea tāpuni kimu’a he’ene tō ke ‘oua e hū mai e momoko mei tu’a.

Pea kapau ‘oku ke puipui’aki ha ngaahi konga tupenu kehe… kofu’i takatakai ke ma’opo mo malu ‘a e tapa kotoa ‘o e matapā sio’ataa.

‘Oku ‘i ai e ngaahi feitu’u ‘oku fa’a ma’u ai ha ngaahi puipui ta’e totongi

[Title] Heating

[Still images of electric heater, heat pump, Margaret using a heat pump remote]

Ko e hiita tuha mo taau mo fale nofo’anga ‘e faingofua  mo toe ma’ama’a ange ai ‘a hono fakamāfana’i.

Kapau ‘oku ‘i ai hano me’afua māfana pē thermostat ke lava ‘o mate mo mo’ui ‘i ha’a ne momoko pē māfana, ‘e toe ma’ama’a ange ai ‘a e fakamole.

Ko e tikili ‘e 20 ‘e māfana lelei ia ‘i ho’o ‘ā ‘o ‘alu holo - pea toki tukuhifo ke 16 pe ‘i lokimohe ‘i he po’uli.

[Title] Wipe off condensation

[Still image of Margaret wiping condensation from window]

Ko e hauhau koia ‘oku ‘asi ‘i he matapā sio’atā mo e holisii… ‘e nga’unga’u mo ne fakatupu ‘a ‘ene tuhituhi.

Holo mātu’u kotoa ma’u pe kae mātu’u e nofo’anga pea ‘e toe faingofua mo vave ange ai ‘a ‘ene māfana.

[Title] Open windows

[Still images of opening windows]

Fakaavaava ‘i he ‘aho kotoa pe ‘a e ngaahi matapā sio’ataa he miniti e 20 kapau ‘oku ‘alomalie… pea ki’i taimi nounou pē ‘i he fa’ahita’u momokó.

‘E toe mātu’u ange ‘a ho nofo’angaa ‘i hano fakaavaava ke hū atu ha ‘ea fo’ou.

[Fesili standing outside her house]

[Fesili] O lo’u igoa o Fesili. [My name is Fesili]

O le igoa o lo’u tamā o Melie. [My father’s name is Melie]

O le igoa o lo’u tinā o Falefā. [My mother’s name is Falefā]

My husband and I have been living here for 3 years and we have 7 children

To’afitu lo’u fānau. [I have seven children]

[Fesili’s children running up the hallway]

[Fesili’s son getting out of the shower]

You all right there son?

As you can see, it doesn’t take that much to steam up in here, so I just turn on the extractor fan and I open the window a little bit to let the steam out.

You can go and put your ofu on now and get ready for school.

[Fesili in the kitchen]

It's also very important to open your windows or fa’aaoga extractor fan if you have one as it helps steamy areas from getting damp and mouldy.

[Fesili’s daughter removing the gas heater]

We used to have our portable gas heater, which we no longer use because of its dangerous fumes and it was making our fale damp, but now we have this electric heater and it's much safer and cheaper to use.

Another thing that is helpful is having insulation in your home.

[Title] Reduce steam

[Still images of Fesili and her kids opening the windows]

[Voice over] E māfanafana lo’u fale [My house is warm] in winter and it also helps you save money on heating.

Pea ‘e toe mātu’u ange mo si’isi’i ‘a e tuhituhí kapau ‘e fakaava e matapā sio’ata ‘o peitoo ke ‘alu ki tu’a e maoo he taimi ngaahi kai… pea mo loki kaukau foki hili ha’o saoa pē kaukau.

[Still image turning on the extractor fan on the oven]

Kapau ‘oku ‘i ai ha tapili ke ne komo ki tu’a e mao ‘i peito mo loki kaukaǘ pea faka’aonga’i ia.

[Title] Heating

[Still image of an electric heater and a still image of a gas heater with a big X through it]

Kumi ha hiita ‘e ‘ikai hoko ha fakatu'utāmaki ‘i hono ngāue’akí pea mo si’isi’i ai ‘a e fakamolé.  Fakatokanga’i ko e ngaahi hiita kasa tu’utahá te ne fakatupu ‘e ia e hauhaú, lahi ange e fakamolé pea ko hono kohu ‘oku fakatu'utāmaki.

[Title] Insulation

[Still image of insulation in the ceiling]

Ko e founga lelei taha ki hono fakamāfana’i e nofo’angaa.. ko e insulate pē ko hono kofu’i mo ‘aofi māfana ‘a e holisii, ‘aofii mo e falikii ‘o e fale kotoa.  Kapau kuo te’eki fai ia, vakai’i pē ‘e ala lava ke insulate ta’etotongi ‘a ho nofo’angaa.

‘E fakamahino atu pē ‘e lava ke fai eni mei he EECA, kōsilio fakakoloo pē ko ho’o lenilooti.

[Noelini standing outside her house]

[Noelini] Malo e lelei. My name is Noelini

I’m from Kolonga, Tongatapu. My mali  and I, Paola we've been living here in this home for approximately 14 years.

[Noelini inside her house with her husband Paul and kids]

This is my lounge and this is where we all like to hang out during the evenings.

This is my husband Paul and these are my beautiful children.

[Noelini sits infront of the door]

The problem with this room is that there is cold air that comes down through the bottom here, and how I fix that is by getting a draft stopper, and placing it there to stop the cold air from coming through.

[Noelini places a draft stopper against the door]

If you don’t have a draft stopper, you can roll up a dry towel and place it there, and that will stop the draft from coming in.

It’s really important to stop the drafts from coming under the door and through the windows because it helps to keep our house warm.

[Noelini walks into the bathroom]

Something that likes damp areas is mould, it builds up around the windows and on the walls.

As soon as you see it, it's really important to clean it off straight away.

[Noelini mixes up a mould cleaning solution]

To make up the solution you just add one capful of bleach to every litre of water.

If you don’t have bleach, you can also use vinegar to get rid of the mould.

[Noelini wipes down the walls in the bathroom]

Whatever you use, leave it on for about 15 minutes and rinse it off with warm soapy water.

[Noelini bringing in the washing off the line]

When you can, hang your washing out in the sun or in the carport, garage that way it will keep your house dry and it will be less expensive to heat.

So there you go, those are a few things we do to keep our house warm and dry.

[Margaret and her son’s enter the living area of their house]

All right guys, bags off please.

[Margaret and her son’s close the curtains]

Remember to always close your curtains at night and get that heating going

Well done boys.

[Title] Stop draughts

[Voice over] Ta’ofi e hū atu ‘a e momokoo ‘aki ‘a hono monomono ke malu e matapā hū’angá, matapā sio’ataa mo ha tafu’anga afi fakamafanaa.

[Still image of door stopper being placed below door]

‘Oku ‘i ai ‘a e me’a ke ta’ofi’aki e hū mai ‘a e ‘ea momokó he lalo matapā pē te ke takai’i ha tauveli ‘o ngāue’aki ia.

[Still image of weather stripping being installed around windows/doors]

‘Oku ‘i ai e naunau langa ‘e lava ke fakatau ke fakatapa ‘aki e matapā sio’ataa ke ‘oua ‘e hū e momoko ki loto.

[Title] Remove mould

[Still image of mould cleaning solution being mixed up]

 ‘E holo ‘aki e tuhituhii mo e tu’ungafulufulua ‘o e holisii mo e ‘aofii ‘aki ha huhu’a faito’o fakahinehine pē ko e bleach…  pē ko ha vinika hinehina.

[Still image of mould on the wall]

‘Oku tupu mo mo’ui ‘a e tuhituhi ‘i ha feitu’u ‘oku hauhau  mo nga’unga’u.. ‘o uesia ai foki ‘a e mo’ui lelei ‘a e fāmili.

[Title] Dry washing outside

[Still images of washing being hung outside]

Fai ‘a ho’o fakamomoa fō ‘i tu’a pē ‘i he tau’anga me’alelee kae mātu’u ‘a fale.

[Margaret, Fesili & Noelini’s families outside their respective houses]

This is how we roll!

[Title] Key tips for a warmer, drier home

[Voice over] Each of these key tips will help to keep your home warmer, drier, and healthier for your family, and reduce the cost of heating.

Thank you to all the wonderful organisations, families and individuals who helped develop this video.

[Still image listing organisations who have helped ]

Sore throats can lead to rheumatic fever and heart damage

Every time your child has a sore throat, please, get them checked by a doctor or nurse as soon as possible.

If they’re given antibiotics, make sure they take them for the full 10 days, even if they feel better.

If you’re not sure what to do, call Healthline for advice.

For more information about preventing rheumatic fever visit this website [health.govt.nz/rheumaticfever].

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