Mental health (50+ years)

For Māori and non-Māori in the 50–64 years and 65+ years groups, there were no statistically significant differences in reporting a high or very high probability of anxiety or depressive disorder between genders (Table 29). There was a significant difference in the 50–64 years age group when pooling genders, with Māori in this age group significantly more likely to report a high or very high probability of having an anxiety or depressive disorder compared to non-Māori (RR 1.78, CI 1.02–2.54) (data not shown).

Te Rau Hinengaro: The New Zealand Mental Health Survey (Oakley Browne et al 2006) also provides recent information on the prevalence of mental disorders and their patterns of onset and impact for the total New Zealand population and Māori and Pacific populations. Although the differences are not statistically significant, this survey found the 12-month age-standardised prevalence of any mental disorder for Māori males aged 50+ years to be 16.1 percent, compared with 11.0 percent for non-Māori. For females in this age group the prevalence of any mental disorder was 29.3 percent for Māori, compared with 17.8 percent for non-Māori.

How to interpret results – tables

Table 29: Mental health indicators, Māori and non-Māori, by gender, 2006/07
Indicator Males Females
  50–64 years 65+ years 50–64 years 65+ years
  Māori non-Maori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori
High or very high probability of anxiety or depressive disorder, 2006/07, percent 6.4
(3.1–11.3)
3.7
(2.7–4.8)
7.3
(2.0–17.5)
6.0
(4.3–7.8)
8.6
(4.7–14.1)
4.7
(3.5–6.0)
8.2
(4.6–13.4)
6.6
(4.8–8.5)

Source: 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey, Ministry of Health

Notes:
High or very high probability of anxiety or depressive disorder is indicated by the respondent scoring a Kessler-10 (K10) score of 12 or more.
Age standardised to the 2001 Census total Māori population.
Prioritised ethnicity has been used see Ngā Tapuae me ngā Raraunga: Methods and data sources for further information.

 

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