Diabetes (50+ years)

Diabetes indicators

In the 50–64 years age group, the self-reported prevalence of diabetes* was not significantly different for Māori and non-Māori females (RR 1.41, CI 0.68–2.13), but for Māori males it was twice as high as for non-Māori males (RR 2.03, CI 1.18–2.88). In the 65+ years age group, both Māori males and Māori females were twice as likely to report having diabetes compared with non-Māori males and females (RR 1.91, CI 1.10–2.72 for males; RR 1.94, CI 1.13–2.76 for females). Table 22 shows that there are very large disparities between Māori and non-Māori in terms of diabetes complications (renal failure and lower limb amputations).

The rate of renal failure with concurrent diabetes (aged 50–64 years) was 12 times higher in Māori males (RR 12.01, CI 10.19–14.14) and 9.4 times higher in Māori females (RR 9.43, CI 7.75–11.48) when compared with non-Māori males and non-Māori females of the same age, respectively. Disparities between Māori and non-Māori in renal failure with concurrent diabetes were also observed in the 65+ years age group (RR 9.79, CI 7.97–12.02 for males; RR 8.51, CI 6.72–10.78 for females).

Although some of these disparities can be attributed to the higher prevalence of diabetes among Māori, the disproportionately higher rates would suggest that Māori with diabetes are more likely to go on to develop renal failure. For example, among males aged 50–64 years who have diabetes, Māori are almost 6 times (ie, 12.01 2.03) more likely to develop renal failure than non-Māori. For females this age, the likelihood is even higher for Māori because the self-reported prevalence of diabetes in this group is similar for Māori and non-Māori. So, among females aged 50–64 years who have diabetes, Māori are 9.4 times more likely to develop renal failure.

Similarly, there were large disparities in the rates of lower limb amputation with concurrent diabetes in both age groups, with the greatest disparity in females. Table 22 shows that the rate of lower limb amputation with concurrent diabetes for Māori females aged 50–64 years was over 10 times higher than for non-Māori females the same age (RR 10.70, CI 7.58–15.11). So, among females aged 50–64 years who have diabetes, Māori are 10.7 times more likely to have a lower limb amputated.

In the 65+ years age group, the rate of lower limb amputation with concurrent diabetes for Māori females is over 6 times higher than for non-Māori (RR 6.55, CI 4.37–9.80). Therefore, among females aged 65+ years who have diabetes, Māori are 6.6 times more likely to undergo lower limb amputation than non-Māori.

How to interpret results – tables

Table 22: Diabetes indicators, Māori and non-Māori, by gender
  Males Females
  50–64 years 65+ years 50–64 years 65+ years
Indicator Māori non-Maori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori
Diagnosed diabetes prevalence (self-reported), 2006/07, percent 17.7
(11.4–24.0)
8.7
(6.7–10.7)
28.4
(17.9–40.9)
14.9
(12.3–17.4)
8.2
(4.8–11.7)
5.8
(4.5–7.2)
22.9
(14.3–31.5)
11.8
(9.2–14.3)
Diabetes complications – renal failure with concurrent diabetes, 2007–09, rate per 100,000 347.5
(306.7–393.8)
28.9
(23.6–35.4)
639.4
(538.1–759.8)
65.3
(52.8–80.9)
201.2
(172.3–234.8)
21.3
(17.2–26.5)
433.8
(355.4–529.6)
51.0
(40.6–64.0)
Diabetes complications – lower limb amputation with concurrent diabetes, 2007–09, rate per 100,000 141.5
(116.5–171.8)
20.7
(16.9–25.4)
245.9
(185.2–326.4)
64.9
(54.7–76.9)
68.7
(52.9–89.2)
6.4
(4.3–9.6)
123.7
(86.7–176.3)
18.9
(13.6–26.2)

Sources: 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey, Ministry of Health; National Minimum Dataset (Hospital Events) (MNMDS), Ministry of Health

Notes:
Age standardised to the 2001 Census total Māori population.
Hospitalisations are ethnicity-adjusted rates; all other rates use prioritised ethnicity see Ngā Tapuae me ngā Raraunga: Methods and data sources for further information.
Diagnosed diabetes includes Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

Get Checked programme indicator

The Get Checked programme has been in place since June 2000 with the aim of improving the health of people with diabetes by encouraging regular free checks of their physical health, lifestyle and management of the disease.

The 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey showed that among those who had self-reported having diabetes, Māori in both age groups were equally as likely as non-Māori of the same age to report having accessed the Get Checked programme.

How to interpret results – tables

Table 23: Get Checked programme indicator, Māori and non-Māori, by gender, 2006/07
  Males Females
  50–64 years 65+ years 50–64 years 65+ years
Indicator Māori non-Maori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori
Had Diabetes Get Checked (self-reported) in past 12 months, 2006/07, percent 81.5
(63.6–93.0)
59.7
(47.1–72.3)
78.9
(71.2–86.6)
77.3
(56.7–91.3)
67.2
(54.6–79.9)
86.0
(67.5–96.2)
74.5
(66.4–82.7)

Source: 2006/07 New Zealand Health Survey, Ministry of Health

Notes:
Age standardised to the 2001 Census total Māori population.
Prioritised ethnicity has been used see Ngā Tapuae me ngā Raraunga: Methods and data sources for further information.
A dash (–) indicates that the data were unavailable due to low counts.

*Note that self-reported diabetes underestimates the true prevalence because some people living with type 2 diabetes have not yet been diagnosed.

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