Socioeconomic indicators (50+ years)

Table 7 presents information on various socioeconomic indicators. It uses crude rates rather than age-standardised rates, and so caution should be exercised when comparing Māori and non-Māori results. Crude rates accurately portray the situation within each population but make comparisons difficult because they do not take into account different age distributions in each of the populations.

The results show that older non-Māori were more advantaged than older Māori across all the socioeconomic indicators presented.

How to interpret results – tables

Table 7: Socioeconomic indicators for older people: percentage of each ethnic group, Māori and non-Māori, by gender, 2006
  Males Females
  50–64 years 65+ years 50–64 years 65+ years
Indicator Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori Māori non-Māori
School completion (Level 2 Certificate or higher), 2006, percent 35.9 62.0 28.1 52.7 34.5 52.8 24.4 39.9
Unemployed, 2006, percent 3.4 1.8 1.1 0.3 3.6 1.6 0.6 0.1
Total personal income less than $10,000, 2006, percent 13.9 9.4 17.5 11.5 22.9 20.8 18.7 13.6
Receiving means-tested benefit, 2006, percent 23.8 10.8 6.0 3.2 29.3 12.9 4.9 2.7
Living in household without telephone access, 2006, percent 5.9 1.3 4.9 1.3 4.5 0.7 3.2 0.6
Living in household without motor vehicle access, 2006, percent 7.7 2.9 10.8 6.5 10.2 3.6 21.9 17.9
Not living in own home, 2006, percent 44.1 21.8 38.0 20.4 45.1 20.1 41.5 25.1
Household crowding, 2006, percent 11.7 3.7 8.8 2.1 14.1 3.7 10.0 2.4
Voluntary work (through organisation, group or marae), 2006, percent 18.0 14.9 17.2 15.0 22.7 17.7 17.2 16.2

Source: 2006 Census of Population and Dwellings, Statistics New Zealand

Notes:
Crude rates have been used.
Prioritised ethnicity has been used – see Ngā Tapuae me ngā Raraunga: Methods and data sources for further information.
‘Means-tested benefit’ includes the unemployment benefit, sickness benefit, domestic purposes benefit, invalid’s benefit and student allowance.
‘Not living in own home’ is based on the ‘tenure holder’ variable which records whether the person owns the dwelling they live in.
‘Household crowding’ is based on the Canadian National Crowding Index. A required number of bedrooms is calculated for each household (based on the age, sex and number of people living in the dwelling), which is compared with the actual number of bedrooms. A household is considered crowded when there are fewer bedrooms than required.

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